The Sacred Canopy: Elements of a Sociological Theory of by Peter L. Berger

  • admin
  • April 2, 2017
  • Religion
  • Comments Off on The Sacred Canopy: Elements of a Sociological Theory of by Peter L. Berger

By Peter L. Berger

This crucial contribution to the sociology of faith presents an research that clarifies the usually ironic interplay among faith and society.  Berger is famous for his concise and lucid type.

Show description

Read or Download The Sacred Canopy: Elements of a Sociological Theory of Religion PDF

Similar religion books

The Sacred Canopy: Elements of a Sociological Theory of Religion

This significant contribution to the sociology of faith presents an research that clarifies the usually ironic interplay among faith and society.   Berger is famous for his concise and lucid sort.

The Daēva Cult in the Gāthās: An Ideological Archaeology of Zoroastrianism (Iranian Studies)

Addressing the query of the origins of the Zoroastrian faith, this booklet argues that the intransigent competition to the cult of the daēvas, the traditional Indo-Iranian gods, is the foundation of the improvement of the 2 primary doctrines of Zoroastrianism: cosmic dualism and eschatology (fate of the soul after demise and its passage to the opposite world).

Additional resources for The Sacred Canopy: Elements of a Sociological Theory of Religion

Example text

NEB's "open country"). , "artificially flattened surfaces or 'fields'," suitable for agricultural (especially vineyards and orchards) or architectural uses, built onto the natural slope leading prophets . . were sometimes buried near holy sites" and cites Ezek. 43:7-8 as also "pertinent" (Judahite Burial Practices and Beliefs about the Dead [ J S O T S u p 123/ASOR Monograph 7; Sheffield: J S O T , 1992] 116). Nothing is known of the burial of (North-)Israelite kings; Ezek. 43:7-8 pertains to the burial of Judahite kings (cf.

While the "crushing" of the idols may echo 2 Kgs. 23:6, the Chronicler has generalized the practice (15:16, following 1 Kgs. 15:13) and has already purified the T e m p l e in the course of Manasseh's reign, making it unlikely that v. 4 b a is his equivalent o f t h a t verse. 18 T h e interpretation just proposed for v. 4bß further distances the two; it is reminiscent of the treatment of the bones taken from tombs described in J e r . 8:1-3, but is difficult to explain on the basis of anything in the final form of the Kings reform report.

Simon, concludes his largely literary study ("I Kings 13: A Prophetic Sign—Denial and Persistence, ‫ יי‬HUCA 47 [1976] 117): "The ancient word of the Lord, obliterated except for the marker of the sepulcher of the man of god, reappeared and broke through into history in its full power [in the events reported in 2 Kgs. , Cogan-Tadmor simply take it for granted that 'Josiah fulfilled an ancient prophecy, which an unnamed man of God had pronounced against Jeroboam's altar" (II Kings, 299-300), while Gray considers 23:16-20 to be a later interpolation, "notwithstanding the historicity of the events" (I II Kings, 714).

Download PDF sample

Rated 4.96 of 5 – based on 4 votes