The Daēva Cult in the Gāthās: An Ideological Archaeology of by Amir Ahmadi

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By Amir Ahmadi

Addressing the query of the origins of the Zoroastrian faith, this publication argues that the intransigent competition to the cult of the daēvas, the traditional Indo-Iranian gods, is the basis of the advance of the 2 relevant doctrines of Zoroastrianism: cosmic dualism and eschatology (fate of the soul after dying and its passage to the opposite world).

The daēva cult because it seems to be within the Gāthās, the oldest a part of the Zoroastrian sacred textual content, the Avesta, had eschatological pretentions. The poet of the Gāthās condemns those as deception. The ebook seriously examines a variety of theories recommend because the nineteenth century to account for the condemnation of the daēvas. It then turns to the suitable Gāthic passages and analyzes them intimately so one can supply an image of the cult and the explanations for its repudiation. ultimately, it examines fabrics from different resources, specifically the Greek debts of Iranian ritual lore (mainly) within the context of the secret cults. Classical Greek writers continually affiliate the nocturnal rite of the magi with the mysteries as belonging to an analogous religious-cultural classification. This indicates that Iranian non secular lore integrated a nocturnal ceremony that aimed toward making sure the soul’s trip to the past and a fascinating afterlife.

Challenging the favourite scholarship of the Greek interpretation of Iranian non secular lore and presenting a brand new research of the formation of the Hellenistic inspiration of ‘magic,’ this e-book is a crucial source for college students and students of historical past, faith and Iranian reports.

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The Daēva Cult in the Gāthās: An Ideological Archaeology of Zoroastrianism (Iranian Studies)

Addressing the query of the origins of the Zoroastrian faith, this publication argues that the intransigent competition to the cult of the daēvas, the traditional Indo-Iranian gods, is the foundation of the advance of the 2 critical doctrines of Zoroastrianism: cosmic dualism and eschatology (fate of the soul after demise and its passage to the opposite world).

Extra resources for The Daēva Cult in the Gāthās: An Ideological Archaeology of Zoroastrianism (Iranian Studies)

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I will not, however, deny that the festival in its classical form received a kind of significance from its connection with the Dionysos cult. first time (cf. ITS SURVIVAL IN CLASSICAL MYTH 1$ We are also reminded, among others, of Eurystheus, who hid himself in a large vessel when Herakles approached with the Erymanthian boar translated into common speech, he became "deadly afraid," and of Ares, who was held prisoner in a vat. The Danish scholar Blinkenberg in an interesting study, "Hades Munding" (Danske Videnskabernes Selskab, 1919, II, 5), has dealt with some part of our evidential material and especially with one representa- on an Attic lekythos, now in Jena, in which Hermes Psychopompos may be seen standing beside the mouth of a large storage vessel the greater part of which is buried in the earth (fig.

The owl which sat near the wine cellar and chased away the bees from the jar which contained honey, and which Glaukos had died, must also be remembered. It reminds us of the epiphany of the Deity in the form of a bird in prehistoric times. Aelianus (Nat. anim, V, in 2) relates that a THE PREHISTORIC RELIGION OF GREECE 2O sea eagle which came flying from over the waters and settled on the coast first showed Polyidos that the boy was not drowned, but had died on land. In the incident relating that Polyidos was shut up with the dead child's body in a monumentum, or, according to Tzetzes (Scholia), in an oi/oj/za, to reanimate the corpse, we may be certain that we have to deal with some form of grave construction.

Nilsson, Minoan-Mycenaean Religion, pp. , I, pp. , pp. 137 ff. We shall return to these two objects later. The female dancing figure in the middle suggests an orgiastic cult rite. The ankh-shaped double axe and the chrysalis, according to Evans' interpretation, contain a promise of resurrection. Ring no. 4. We now proceed to a gold signet ring from Mycenae, reproduced here after a cast published by Furtwangler, Antike Gemmen, pi. vi, 3. To the left stands the bowed figure of a mourning woman bent over an enclosure composed of vertical and horizontal posts with garlands between the two foremost vertical sup- RINGS AND THE VEGETATION CYCLE 39 Within the enclosure, in the foremost opening, is to tall, narrow baetyl, with a small figure-eight ports.

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