Hosea and Salvation History: The Early Traditions of Israel by Dwight R. Daniels

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By Dwight R. Daniels

During this in-depth examine drawing at the paintings of Gerhard Von Rad and different salvation-historical students, Dwight R. Daniels reconstruct Hosea’s figuring out of Israel’s background and the way Israel is the manager communicator of God’s salvation for the area.

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For it to do so one would have to presuppose that an idea or phrase must occur twice before it can be authentic, but such a presupposition is arbitrary. Also, the argument in this form can at best establish that Hosea drew upon a set or common phraseology. This in fact appears to be the case. ^' The cultic background also accounts for the elevated language, and hence there are no compelling reasons to deny Hosea the verse. Turning to structure, the passage opens with the announcement that Yahweh has a contention with brael and a statement of his purpose in the contention (v.

A second retrospection begins 33 " The same division is advocated by Wolff and Jeremias, each with one unclear point in his presentation. Although WollT views both 4:1 and 4:4 as beginning a speech (p. XXIV), he also states that in the present literary composition the τκ "yet" of 4:4 connects 4:4ff with 4:1-3 (p. 90). Similarly, and at the same time in the opposite direction, Jeremias initially seems to indicate that 4:1-19 constitutes a single literaiy complex (p. 19), but in his exegesis he treats 4:1-3 and 4:4-19 separately, with no explanation of the "yet" of 4:4.

1-3 are usually assigned to the second half of the reign of Jeroboam II. Hos. 1:4 presupposes that the dynasty of Jehu is still on the throne, and the prosperity of the latter half of the reign of Jeroboam II accords well with the depiction of Israel's luxuriant lifestyle in 2:7, 10-11, 13, 15 (5, 8-9, 11, 13). If, as the current composition of the book implies, Hosea's children influenced only the beginning of his prophetic ministry, then 2:1-3, 23-25 may also be assigned to this period. That, on the one hand, the material of these chapters probably stems from Hosea's early ministry, and, on the other, that they were not utilized in the two subsequent collections (Hos.

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