Decline of Medieval Hellenism in Asia Minor and the Process by Speros Jr. Vryonis

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By Speros Jr. Vryonis

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Though the number of these Neo-Phrygian inscriptions is in itself considerable (xoo), one should keep in mind the fact that in eastern Phrygia alone there were some 1,076 inscriptions found. 240Certainly some knowledge of Neo-Phrygian existed in the mid-third century. 242 At least references to these early languages are, so far as it has been possible to ascertain, lacking in thc sources. It is true, however, that in the easternmost parts of Anatolia, Armenian, Syriac, Kurdish, Georgian, Arabic, and possibly Lazic not only survived but were spoken by the overwhelming majority.

616. Matthew of Edessa, p. 126. Honigmann, Oslgret~re,p. O n the general absorption of the Armenian east, A. hkulian, EinuerleiDur~gannenisclren Territorien durch Byznnt iin XI. Jnhrhrmdert; ein Beitrag zur vorseldsclutken Periode der armenische Geschichle (1912)~284 Laurent, Byzance et les TWCS, p. 33. Cedrenus, 11, 626. Attaliates, 97. ISG Michael the Syrian, 111, 133. 287 Harnack, D i e Mission, 11, 734. , pp. 732-733. I 88. 55 EVE OF THE TURKISH CONQUEST however, bore the marks of t h e absorptive process.

P. D. Calder attributes R few of the inscriptions to the end of the second century. a 3 8 Priederich, “Phrygia,” p. 870. 47 EVE O F THE TURKISH CONQUEST monuments for the most part in fixed ritualistic, formulaic curses. One is not convinced, as a result, that Phrygian existed as a vital living language among the people. W. M. ” The powerful influence of Greek is evident i n these inscriptions. Aside from the alphabet, there is the fact that most of the epitaphs are in Greek, as are most of the names.

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