Beyond Intellectual Property: Toward Traditional Resource by Darrell A. Posey, Graham Dutfield

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  • April 2, 2017
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By Darrell A. Posey, Graham Dutfield

For indigenous peoples’ teams, activists and policymakers in highbrow estate, and all these interested by the protection of our planet’s organic and cultural range, past highbrow estate presents a useful and eye-opening look at some of the most provocative and explosive problems with this century and certain the subsequent: the patenting of lifestyles.

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1), which keeps seed banks of the main crop varieties grown in Rwanda, plans to distribute seeds to Rwandan farmers to replace stocks lost because of war. Ex situ conservation need not require resources to be kept in an international institution far from the communities where they occur naturally. 2). Conservation of landscapes When the United Nations list of national parks and equivalent reserves was first compiled, the main priority was conservation of wildlife and ecosystems. The intention in creating protected areas was to save them for future generations to enjoy, but it is now recognized that many of these places will change or even be impoverished if there is not a continuation of the patterns of use and occupation that have been taking place for hundreds of years.

As a result, a number of companies and nonprofit organizations have begun to work with indigenous communities to acquire information leading to the development of new products and to create socially and environmentally sound strategies for acquiring raw materials. However, on occasion companies obtain knowledge and biological material by deception — for example, by sending employees to communities who do not admit that their purpose is to search for knowledge or biological resources that will be of financial benefit to their company.

These may include objects produced by people who lived in the past, but they may also display items manufactured by present-day peoples, including sacred and secret objects. Art galleries display works of art and crafts. They may be large and own several semipermanent displays or small privately owned galleries offering specialist collections, such as textiles or carvings acquired from certain parts of the world. Sacred objects of indigenous peoples have been returned on occasion, a recent example being the sacred weavings of the people of Coroma, Bolivia (see Chapter 10).

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